The Importance of Sleep

The Information below was taken from the website  https://what0-18.nhs.uk/parentscarers/sleep

Good quality sleep is important for everyone but especially for children as it directly impacts on their mental and physical development. During the deep states of sleep, blood supply to your child’s muscles is increased, energy is restored, tissue growth and repair occur, and important hormones are released for growth. Good sleep helps to improve attention, behaviour, learning and memory.

It’s recommended that infants from 4 months – 1 year get 12-15 hours of sleep per day (24-hour period). This includes daytime naps.
Sleep Tips for Infants:

  • Develop regular daytime and bedtime schedules; maintain consistent sleep and wake times
  • Create a consistent and enjoyable bedtime routine.
  • Establish a regular ‘sleep friendly’ environment.
  • Encourage your baby to fall asleep independently i.e., while awake but drowsy.

It’s recommended that toddlers aged 1-2 years get 11-14 hours of sleep per day (24-hour period). This includes daytime naps.
Sleep Tips for Toddlers:

  • Maintain a daily sleep schedule and a consistent and enjoyable bedtime routine.
  • Maintain a regular ‘sleep friendly’ environment, and teach the child to settle in the same environment that they will later wake up in during the night (i.e., their bedroom).
  • Encourage your toddler to fall asleep independently i.e., while awake but drowsy.
  • Set limits that are consistent, communicated and enforced. If parents do not set limits children will invariably choose a later bedtime.

It’s recommended that pre-schoolers aged 3-5 years get 10-13 hours of sleep per day (24-hour period). This includes any daytime naps.
Sleep Tips for Pre-schoolers:

  • Maintain a consistent and enjoyable sleep schedule and bedtime routine.
  • Maintain a regular ‘sleep friendly’ environment, with the child settling in the same environment that they will later wake up in during the night (i.e., their bedroom). This should be without any screens an hour before bedtime – so no TV, mobile phones, tablets or computers.
  • Set limits that are consistent, communicated and enforced. If parents do not set limits children will invariably choose a later bedtime.
  • You could try giving your child one of two bedtime ‘passes’ that can be exchanged for a parent response, and if they are not used, they can exchange them for a small reward such as a sticker in the morning.

 

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